Brittle Skillet

Sparks of passion and items of interest.

Posts Tagged ‘Obama

Peace Prize as a Call to Action for the World

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Obama

Update: December 10, 2009 War and Peace?

“My task here is to continue on the path that I believe is not only important for America, but important for lasting peace in the world,” Obama said. His goals include stabilizing Afghanistan, mobilizing an international effort to deal with terrorism and combating climate change.

For the whole article, visit NPR’s Obama Defends U.S. Wars As He Accepts Nobel Prize.

Updated October 12, 2009

At a brief address on the front lawn of the White House this morning, President Obama accepted the award of the Nobel Peace Prize “as a call to action—a call for all nations to confront the common challenges of the 21st century.” Does President Obama deserve this award now? This is perhaps the first question that comes to mind upon hearing the news. Even President Obama judges himself undeserving “to be in the company of so many of the transformative figures who’ve been honored by this prize.”

Given what seems to be his life purpose, I believe he is deserving. However, there is still time needed to assess his actual achievements towards peace. Two obvious, top-of-mind areas of long-needed “peaceful” progress are the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. While the outcomes of these conflicts are tenuous and mired in complexity, we are in the middle of creating this history. Ultimately, time will judge how deserving President Obama is of today’s honor.

I have complete faith that Obama’s genuine intentions lead him to work for cooperation and best possible outcomes among a diversity of world views and motivations (which ultimately equates to peace). Can he effectively activate these good and genuine intentions? Can he successfully achieve the cooperation the world needs for peaceful outcomes?

These are questions that will be answered not only by the actions of our president, but also by the actions of leaders of other nations around the world. Cooperation does not come from one source; it is co-operative, necessitating genuine intentions for the best possible outcomes among a diversity of world views from the very holders of those world views.

As reflected in his speech this morning, he is fully aware that, “These challenges can’t be met by any one leader or any one nation.” So, in the end, how will we judge how deserving or not President Obama is? This reminds me that the success of any one of us is not based solely on our own efforts. We need a certain amount of cooperation for any success at all.

To view and hear President Obama’s six-minute reaction to the award, please visit THE BLOG: Building a World that “Gives LIfe to the Promise of Our Founding Documents”.

Related article: Nobel Surprise, by Hendrik Hertzberg

Graphic courtesy of P/\UL 

© Julie Pierce and Brittle Skillet, 2009-2011.

Written by Julie Pierce

October 9, 2009 at 1:22 pm

Our Terminally Ill Situation: Reality Check from the White House

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nurseUpdated 08/19/09

Beautiful! WhiteHouse.gov just launched a new site called Reality Check. Here’s where the Obama Administration tries to lay it all out in video and text. Here’s where they make a stab at answering the myriad questions we all have about what the trendy phrase “health insurance reform” actually means, debunking myths and rumors.

If you have a question or a myth that you’d like addressed, pop open the contact form and ask away. You can identify yourself or remain anonymous. The only identity requirement is an email address, which you could create for just this one communication.

HealthReform.gov is a related site that’s been up for a while now. Here, the many different facets of the larger health reform challenge are examined and shared. The site includes examples of state and community health systems that are successful in terms of efficiency and economy — examples to be learned from. Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of the Department of Health & Human Services presents weekly video updates sharing where we are on the map of progress in a generalized summary statement.

Between these two sites, we have the opportunity to gain a real understanding of the challenges, issues, conflicts, dilemmas, and possible solutions of a system that itself is terminally ill. Change is imminent. It must occur. We cannot carry on the way we are now. The cost of health care must be reduced, education for self-care and prevention must be increased, the option to receive care must be available to all Americans, and this can only happen via improved efficiencies.

Don’t give up on the idea that we can have a better health care system. Let’s look at what compromises each side of the debate can make while still not compromising the larger value of a reliable health care system from which everyone — every single American citizen — can benefit. Let’s do what’s necessary to move our country forward.

Setting the Record Straight (launched 08/19/09)
“Where we do disagree, let’s disagree over things that are real, not these wild misrepresentations that bear no resemblance to anything that’s actually been proposed.” -President Obama

Graphic by Jolante

© Julie Pierce and Brittle Skillet, 2009-2011.

Written by Julie Pierce

August 10, 2009 at 3:31 pm

Sotomayor Wins Senate Judiciary Committee Vote

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By Jay Tamboli

What an exciting, historic success! Sonia Sotomayor is well on her way to taking her place on our country’s highest court as the first Hispanic Supreme Court Justice. With the Senate Judiciary Committee voting 13 to 6 in her favor, the expected outcome for next week’s full Senate vote is confirmation.

Despite the GOP’s efforts to distract focus with “look-over-here” tactics, the vote for she who can execute justice according to the rule of law without influence of her own biases and preferences has been firmly achieved. We’re moving forward, people!

Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina was the only Republican to vote today with the Democratic majority for Sotomayor. Who would have imagined? In reaction to the vote, he even went so far as to say, “America has changed for the better with her selection.”

Senator Graham, your choice and standout action to vote against the rest of your party reinforces hope that we are closer to the day when our leaders and representatives are playing less of the politics game and making decisions based more on America’s best interest. Thank you, Sir.

Photo by Jay Tamboli

© Julie Pierce and Brittle Skillet, 2009-2011.

Written by Julie Pierce

July 28, 2009 at 10:49 am

U.S. and China on Common Ground: Strategic and Economic Dialogue

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By futureatlas.com

Once again, we see progress with the Obama Administration. In the area of foreign policy, today was a monumental day. In the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C., the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue was opened with its inaugural session.

In an op-ed piece published by the Wall Street Journal, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Secretary of the Treasury Timothy Geithner explain the objectives of this historical dialogue. The collaborative connection between China and the U.S. is highlighted and emphasized as a significant venture for the global economy and the future of our world.

In a nutshell, there are three main modules of the larger area objectives:

  • Establishment of global economic recovery and sustainable global economic growth
  • Progress with the inseparable challenges of climate change, energy, and the environment
  • Achievement of globally favorable practices in the face of security and development challenges

Although this is an official dialogue opened between the U.S. and China, other nations will need to be engaged as these two work to discover viable solutions. Secretary Clinton and Secretary Geithner write, “few global problems can be solved by the U.S. or China alone. And few can be solved without the U.S. and China together.”

It will be interesting to watch the dialogue develop and unfold. How will these two nations work together? How will their coming together influence the rest of the world’s nations to unify toward global goals? Can we be as encouraged as to hope that human rights will be one of the details under “globally favorable practices in the face of security and development challenges”?

I take encouragement from a front-page article from China Daily. Despite the downplay by foreign press and various “experts,” some in China are seeing the dialogue as an important achievement.

I am optimistic for a progressive turn of events. There is light dawning at the end of a long, dark tunnel. Thank you, President Obama for carrying the torch.

Photo by futureatlas.com

© Julie Pierce and Brittle Skillet, 2009-2011.

Written by Julie Pierce

July 27, 2009 at 6:59 pm

Sotomayor: Latina of Clear Judgement

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Poster by Favianna Rodriguez, presente.org

I vote “Yes” for Sonia Sotomayor! Listening to her responses during the questioning process of her hearing, I was impressed by the way Sotomayor remained calm and thoughtful, collected and deliberate no matter how ridiculous or heated the questions and remarks of the various senators became. This woman is a consistent thinker and is very clear about the difference between the rule of law (the stick by which every judicial decision must be measured) and her personal preferences and opinions.

Aren’t these traits exactly what we want in a Supreme Court Justice? A person who is publicly aware (by self-declaration) of her biases and the contrast between those and the rule of law — how perfect! Her track record of case decisions reflects a clear difference between her rulings and her biases, specifically in cases involving race discrimination.

Despite this clarity, there are some who are still clinging to and expressing concerns about her personal preferences regarding race and immigration policies. Out of a endless list of cases, there is only one case in which Sotomayor ruled against the white plaintiff in a racial discrimination case. Her ruling, which was unanimously shared by the two other judges on the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, was in line with and supported by federal law. Sotomayor ruled by following the law, not by following her personal preferences.

The fact that the GOP continues to gin up concern about her personal biases is just silly politics as usual. Her personal preferences are really not the issue here. How does she perform as a judge? That’s the question. The answer is perfectly satisfactory: she follows the rule of law without prejudice.

Sotomayor hearings: The complete transcript, Part 1

Sotomayor hearings: The complete transcript, Part 2

Poster by Favianna Rodriguez, presente.org

© Julie Pierce and Brittle Skillet, 2009-2011.

Written by Julie Pierce

July 25, 2009 at 5:53 pm